Strong Armed Robbery Charges & Penalties by State

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Strong arm robbery is a specific type of larceny that involves the use of threat, force, or intimidation to take someone else’s property. Unlike armed robbery, strong arm robbery typically does not involve a traditional weapon like a gun or knife. Instead, it might involve using an object that can be perceived as a weapon, or even just the threat of violence.

What Constitutes Strong Arm Robbery?

Larceny, at its core, is the unlawful taking of someone else’s property with the intent to permanently deprive them of it. Strong arm robbery elevates this by incorporating the element of threat or force. For example, if someone robs a bank and claims to have a gun, even without displaying one, it could be considered strong arm robbery. Similarly, using physical force to snatch a purse or wallet also falls under this category.

Interestingly, strong arm robbery doesn’t always involve a real weapon. A person can be charged with this crime if they use an object that appears to be a weapon, or even a fake weapon, to intimidate the victim. For instance, handing a note to a bank teller claiming to have a gun, even if there isn’t one, still constitutes strong arm robbery because of the implied threat.

Legal Definitions and Interpretations

State laws can vary significantly in how they define and prosecute strong arm robbery. Generally, it involves the use of physical force or threats with hands, arms, feet, or other body parts to intimidate the victim and take their property.

For a crime to be classified as strong arm robbery, there must be an element of taking the property and carrying it away. This means that even if the property is only taken for a short duration, the crime can still be charged. For example, if a robber grabs someone’s purse and then discards it a few minutes later, they can still face strong arm robbery charges.

Strong Arm Robbery FAQ

  • What is strong-arm robbery?
    • Strong-arm robbery involves stealing using physical force or intimidation without weapons, typically through threats or physical confrontation.
  • How does strong-arm robbery differ from armed robbery?
    • Unlike armed robbery that uses weapons, strong-arm robbery relies solely on physical force or intimidation to overpower the victim.
  • What are the penalties for strong-arm robbery?
    • Penalties vary by jurisdiction but typically include prison time, fines, and probation, reflecting the severity and circumstances of the crime.
  • Can you go to jail for strong-arm robbery?
    • Yes, jail or prison sentences are common for strong-arm robbery, depending on the severity of the incident and criminal history.
  • How is strong-arm robbery defined legally?
    • Legally, strong-arm robbery is defined as taking someone’s property by violence or intimidation without using a weapon.
  • What is the difference between strong-arm robbery and theft?
    • Theft involves taking property without permission or knowledge, while strong-arm robbery involves force or threat during the act.
  • What are some examples of strong-arm robbery?
    • Examples include mugging someone on the street, forcibly snatching a purse or demanding someone’s wallet through physical intimidation.
  • How can one defend against strong-arm robbery charges?
    • Defenses may include proving lack of intent, mistaken identity, or that no force or intimidation was used during the incident.
  • What should I do if I’m a victim of strong-arm robbery?
    • Report the crime to the police immediately, provide all possible details, and seek medical attention if injured during the robbery.
  • Is strong-arm robbery considered a violent crime?
    • Yes, it is classified as a violent crime due to the use of force or threat of force.
  • What evidence is needed to prove strong-arm robbery?
    • Evidence might include victim testimony, surveillance footage, witness statements, and any physical evidence linking the accused to the scene.
  • Can strong-arm robbery charges be reduced or dismissed?
    • Charges can be reduced or dismissed based on weak evidence, procedural errors, or through negotiation by criminal defense attorneys near you.
  • How long is the sentence for strong-arm robbery?
    • Sentences can range from a few years to over a decade in prison, influenced by factors like prior convictions and injury to victims.
  • What are the psychological effects on victims of strong-arm robbery?
    • Victims may experience trauma, fear, anxiety, and a long-lasting impact on their sense of security and well-being.
  • How do police investigate strong-arm robbery cases?
    • Investigations typically involve gathering evidence, interviewing witnesses, reviewing surveillance videos, and using forensic methods to identify suspects.
  • What is the statute of limitations for strong-arm robbery?
    • The statute of limitations varies but generally ranges from three to six years, allowing time for charges to be brought forth.
  • Can minors be charged with strong-arm robbery?
    • Yes, minors can be charged, but they typically face juvenile court proceedings which focus more on rehabilitation than punishment.
  • What are the legal consequences of a strong-arm robbery conviction?
    • Consequences include imprisonment, fines, probation, and a permanent criminal record, which can affect future employment and civil rights.
  • How does the court process work for strong-arm robbery cases?
    • Begins with an arrest, followed by an arraignment, preliminary hearings, possible plea bargaining, trial, and then sentencing if convicted.
  • Are there any famous cases of strong-arm robbery?
    • Famous cases often involve celebrities or high-profile criminals, but specific details or names vary by location and media coverage.

Strong Arm Robbery Penalties by State

Strong arm robbery is typically classified as a felony, which means it can carry severe penalties, often including more than a year of imprisonment. The severity of the punishment can vary depending on the state and the specific circumstances of the crime. Here’s a look at how different states handle strong arm robbery. Strong arm robbery involves using force or intimidation without a weapon to commit theft. The specifics and penalties for strong arm robbery vary by state:

AlabamaHawaiiMassachusettsNew MexicoSouth Dakota
AlaskaIdahoMichiganNew YorkTennessee
ArizonaIllinoisMinnesotaNorth CarolinaTexas
ArkansasIndianaMississippiNorth DakotaUtah
CaliforniaIowaMissouriOhioVermont
ColoradoKansasMontanaOklahomaVirginia
ConnecticutKentuckyNebraskaOregonWashington
DelawareLouisianaNevadaPennsylvaniaWest Virginia
FloridaMaineNew HampshireRhode IslandWisconsin
GeorgiaMarylandNew JerseySouth CarolinaWyoming

Alabama

Under Code of Alabama Section 13A-8-43:

  • Robbery in the third degree is a Class C felony, punishable by 1 to 10 years in prison and fines up to $15,000.

Alaska

Under Alaska Statutes Section 11.41.510:

  • Robbery in the second degree, involving force or intimidation without a weapon, is a Class B felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $100,000.

Arizona

Under Arizona Revised Statutes Section 13-1902:

  • Strong arm robbery is a Class 4 felony, punishable by 1 to 3.75 years in prison and fines up to $150,000.

Arkansas

Under Arkansas Code Annotated Section 5-12-102:

  • Robbery is a Class B felony, punishable by 5 to 20 years in prison and fines up to $15,000.

California

Under California Penal Code Section 211:

  • Robbery involving force or intimidation without a weapon is punishable by 2 to 6 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Colorado

Under Colorado Revised Statutes Section 18-4-301:

  • Robbery is a Class 4 felony, punishable by 2 to 6 years in prison and fines up to $500,000.

Connecticut

Under Connecticut General Statutes Section 53a-133:

  • Robbery in the second degree involves using or threatening force, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Delaware

Under Delaware Code Title 11, Section 831:

  • Robbery in the second degree involves using force or intimidation, punishable by 2 to 8 years in prison.

Florida

Under Florida Statutes Section 812.13:

  • Strong arm robbery, involving force or threats without a weapon, is a second-degree felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Georgia

Under Georgia Code Section 16-8-40:

  • Robbery using force or intimidation without a weapon is punishable by 1 to 20 years in prison and fines determined by the court.

Hawaii

Under Hawaii Revised Statutes Section 708-841:

  • Robbery in the second degree, involving force or threats without a weapon, is a Class B felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

Idaho

Under Idaho Code Section 18-6501:

  • Robbery by force or fear is punishable by 5 years to life in prison.

Illinois

Under Illinois Compiled Statutes 720 ILCS 5/18-1:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a Class 2 felony, punishable by 3 to 7 years in prison and fines up to $25,000.

Indiana

Under Indiana Code Section 35-42-5-1:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a Level 5 felony, punishable by 1 to 6 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Iowa

Under Iowa Code Section 711.3:

  • Robbery in the second degree, involving force or threats without a weapon, is a Class C felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $13,660.

Kansas

Under Kansas Statutes Section 21-5420:

  • Robbery using force or intimidation without a weapon is a severity level 5 felony, punishable by 31 to 136 months in prison and fines determined by the court.

Kentucky

Under Kentucky Revised Statutes Section 515.030:

  • Robbery in the second degree involves using force or intimidation, punishable by 10 to 20 years in prison.

Louisiana

Under Louisiana Revised Statutes Section 14:65:

  • Simple robbery involves using force or intimidation, punishable by up to 7 years in prison and fines up to $3,000.

Maine

Under Maine Revised Statutes Title 17-A, Section 651:

  • Robbery without a weapon is a Class B crime, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $20,000.

Maryland

Under Maryland Code Section 3-402:

  • Robbery using force or threats without a weapon is a felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

Massachusetts

Under Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 265, Section 19:

  • Robbery involving force or intimidation without a weapon is punishable by up to 10 years in state prison or up to 2.5 years in a house of correction.

Minnesota

Under Minnesota Statutes Section 609.24:

  • Simple robbery involves using force or threats, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $20,000.

Mississippi

Under Mississippi Code Section 97-3-73:

  • Robbery using force or threats without a weapon is punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

Missouri

Under Missouri Revised Statutes Section 569.030:

  • Robbery in the second degree involves using force or intimidation, punishable by 5 to 15 years in prison.

Montana

Under Montana Code Annotated Section 45-5-401:

  • Robbery involving force or threats is punishable by up to 40 years in prison and fines up to $50,000.

Nebraska

Under Nebraska Revised Statutes Section 28-324:

  • Robbery is a Class II felony, punishable by 1 to 50 years in prison.

Nevada

Under Nevada Revised Statutes Section 200.380:

  • Robbery without a deadly weapon is a Category B felony, punishable by 2 to 15 years in prison.

New Hampshire

Under New Hampshire Revised Statutes Section 636:1:

  • Robbery using force or threats without a weapon is a Class B felony, punishable by 3.5 to 7 years in prison and fines up to $4,000.

New Jersey

Under New Jersey Statutes Section 2C:15-1:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a second-degree crime, punishable by 5 to 10 years in prison and fines up to $150,000.

New Mexico

Under New Mexico Statutes Section 30-16-2:

  • Robbery involving force or intimidation is a third-degree felony, punishable by up to 3 years in prison and fines up to $5,000.

New York

Under New York Penal Law Section 160.10:

  • Robbery in the second degree, involving force or threats without a weapon, is a Class C felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

North Carolina

Under North Carolina General Statutes Section 14-87.1:

  • Common law robbery involving force or intimidation is a Class G felony, punishable by 8 to 31 months in prison and fines determined by the court.

North Dakota

Under North Dakota Century Code Section 12.1-22-01:

  • Robbery is a Class B felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $20,000.

Ohio

Under Ohio Revised Code Section 2911.02:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a third-degree felony, punishable by 9 to 36 months in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Oklahoma

Under Oklahoma Statutes Section 21-791:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Oregon

Under Oregon Revised Statutes Section 164.395:

  • Robbery in the third degree, involving force or intimidation, is a Class C felony, punishable by up to 5 years in prison and fines up to $125,000.

Pennsylvania

Under Pennsylvania Consolidated Statutes Section 3701:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a felony of the second degree, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $25,000.

Rhode Island

Under Rhode Island General Laws Section 11-39-1:

  • Robbery involving force or intimidation is punishable by 5 to 30 years in prison and fines determined by the court.

South Carolina

Under South Carolina Code Section 16-11-325:

  • Strong arm robbery, involving force or intimidation without a weapon, is punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

South Dakota

Under South Dakota Codified Laws Section 22-30-1:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a Class 2 felony, punishable by up to 25 years in prison and fines up to $50,000.

Tennessee

Under Tennessee Code Annotated Section 39-13-401:

  • Robbery involving force or intimidation is a Class C felony, punishable by 3 to 15 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Texas

Under Texas Penal Code Section 29.02:

  • Robbery involving force or threats is a second-degree felony, punishable by 2 to 20 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Utah

Under Utah Code Section 76-6-301:

  • Robbery without a weapon is a second-degree felony, punishable by 1 to 15 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Vermont

Under Vermont Statutes Title 13, Section 608:

  • Robbery involving force or intimidation is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Virginia

Under Virginia Code Section 18.2-58:

  • Robbery without a deadly weapon is punishable by 5 years to life in prison.

Washington

Under Revised Code of Washington Section 9A.56.190:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a Class B felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $20,000.

West Virginia

Under West Virginia Code Section 61-2-12:

  • Robbery without a weapon is punishable by 5 to 18 years in prison.

Wisconsin

Under Wisconsin Statutes Section 943.32:

  • Robbery involving force or threats without a weapon is a Class E felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison and fines up to $50,000.

Wyoming

Under Wyoming Statutes Section 6-2-401:

  • Robbery involving force or intimidation is a felony, punishable by up to 10 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

At the federal level, bank robbery is prosecuted under Title 18 Section 2113 of the United States Code. Conviction can result in up to 20 years in prison and fines up to $250,000.

Defenses Against Strong Arm Robbery Charges

Defending against strong arm robbery charges requires a strategic approach. Common defenses include:

  1. Innocence: Arguing that you did not commit the crime. The burden of proof lies with the prosecution to show beyond a reasonable doubt that you are guilty. If you can present an alibi, such as being out of state at the time of the crime, this defense can be effective.
  2. Intoxication: You may claim that you were under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of the crime, impairing your ability to form the intent to commit robbery. Some states allow this defense, while others do not, particularly if the intoxication was voluntary.
  3. Entrapment: This defense involves showing that you were induced to commit the robbery by someone else, such as an undercover police officer, and that you would not have committed the crime otherwise.
  4. Duress: If you were forced to commit the crime under threat of death or bodily harm, you might argue that you acted under duress.

Conclusion

Strong arm robbery is a serious crime that involves the use of threats, intimidation, or force to steal property. The penalties for this crime can be severe, ranging from several years to decades in prison, depending on the state and the specifics of the case. Understanding the legal implications and potential defenses is crucial for anyone charged with this crime. By comprehending the laws and possible consequences, individuals can better navigate their legal challenges and work towards the best possible outcome.

References