What is Embezzlement? Laws, Charges & Statute of Limitations

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Embezzlement is a form of property theft. It happens when a person who was supposed to manage another person’s or entity’s property, steals some or all of those assets. The important legal aspect is that the person had legal access to the money or property of another but did not actually have legal ownership of it. When you take the money or property of another person or entity, this is stealing. But when you combine the stealing with the fact that the person was in a place of trust, then you have the crime of embezzlement.

Embezzlement Laws

Laws on embezzlement at the federal level target thieves from the federal government. For example, these laws sometimes are used to prosecute park rangers who steal property from a national park. Federal laws in this area also deal with property theft where the property is owned by a private entity. But the government paid for the service or product.

For instance, say there is an employee of a construction company that was hired by the federal government to work on a building that belongs to the government. If that employee steals building materials that the government paid for, then he could be charged with federal embezzlement.

Federal embezzlement laws differ somewhat from state laws. State laws cover thefts by public officials who work for state and local governments, but also embezzlement by people who do not work for the government. For example, employees who steal property from their companies, and those who steal property from people that others entrusted to them, also are charged under state embezzlement laws.

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Accused of embezzlement? Advice from a former D.A.

Embezzlement Crimes & Charges

Federal embezzlement laws are defined by the type of money and property that was taken:

  • Public money, property or records: Anyone who embezzles money, records, property or any other item of value to the US government that is worth more than $1000 will get a fine of $250,000, up to 10 years in prison or both. If the value is under $1000, the fine can be up to $100,000 and up to a year in jail, or both.
  • Tools/materials for counterfeiting: Includes any tools and materials that may be used to create currency notes, federal bonds and more that are circulated by the US government. Penalties for embezzling such items will bring a fine of up to $250,000, 10 years in prison or both.
  • Accounting generally for public money: This deals with embezzling public money by officers of the federal government, agents or employees. Penalties depend upon how much was embezzled. For $1000 and higher, the penalty can be a fine of up to $250,000, or the sum of what was embezzled, up to 10 years in prison or both. For less than $1000, the penalty can be $1000, up to a year in jail or both.

Embezzlement Punishment

Federal embezzlement convictions with $250,000+ fines are considered felonies, and convictions with fines of up to $100,000 are considered misdemeanors.

Imprisonment will vary depending upon the amount that was stolen. You could do six months in jail, or up to 20 to 30 years in prison depending upon the type of violation. How much you are sentenced also depends upon your criminal history.

Embezzlement Sentencing Guidelines

The US government uses a point system to determine the sentence for the crime of embezzlement. The minimum number of points that the person can earn is the Base Offense Level. The lowest Base Offense Level is six, and the highest is 36. The government sets the Base Offense Level at six, if the loss is $5000 or less. The maximum is 36, if the victim’s loss is over $400 million.

Embezzlement Statute of Limitations

The federal statute 18 USC 3282 states that no one can be prosecuted, tried or punished for any non-capital offense unless the indictment is found or information is instituted within five years of the commission of the offense.

Embezzlement Cases

The amounts of money that can be stolen in an embezzlement scheme is shocking. It is hard to imagine that crimes involving billions of dollars stolen are not discovered faster.

Some large federal embezzlement cases have made headlines in recent years. Some of the biggest include:

  • Bernie Madoff, Investment Advisor: Embezzled billions of dollars of investor money.
  • Enron Corp: Billions in accounting fraud and embezzlement of employee retirement funds.
  • Stanford Financial Group: $8 billion in fraud, embezzlement and ponzi scheme.
  • Peregrine Financial: Embezzled $20 million of investor dollars

Embezzlement Laws by State

Embezzlement is a complex crime that often involves many different types of offenders, each requiring different statutes. The value of property that was embezzled and who it was embezzled from are also key factors that determine which statute is applied in each state and which penalty is applicable. A selection of the most important statutes and punishments per state is found below.

AlabamaHawaiiMassachusettsNew MexicoSouth Dakota
AlaskaIdahoMichiganNew YorkTennessee
ArizonaIllinoisMinnesotaNorth CarolinaTexas
ArkansasIndianaMississippiNorth DakotaUtah
CaliforniaIowaMissouriOhioVermont
ColoradoKansasMontanaOklahomaVirginia
ConnecticutKentuckyNebraskaOregonWashington
DelawareLouisianaNevadaPennsylvaniaWest Virginia
FloridaMaineNew HampshireRhode IslandWisconsin
GeorgiaMarylandNew JerseySouth CarolinaWyoming

Alabama

Alabama Code Title 34. Professions and Businesses Section 34-13-7:

  • Value up to $250. Third degree theft of property. Up to one year in jail and fine up to $2,000.
  • Value higher than $250 up to $2,500. Second degree theft of property. Between one and 10 years imprisonment and/or fine up to $15,000.
  • Value higher $2,500. First degree theft of property. Between two and 20 years imprisonment and/or fine up to $30,000.

Alaska

Alaska Statutes: AS 45.05.109. Fraud and Forgery.:

  • Value below $50. 4th degree theft. Class B misdemeanor. Up to 90 days in jail and fine of up to $2,000.
  • Value is $50 up to less than $25,000. 2nd degree theft. Class C felony. Up to five years imprisonment.
  • Value is $25,000 and higher. Class B felony.  Up to 10 years imprisonment.

Arizona

Arizona Revised Statutes Section 13-1802:

  • Value below $1,000. Class 1 misdemeanor. Fine of up to $2,500 plus surcharges and three years probation
  • Value is $1,000 up to less than $2,000, theft of animal for animal fighting, or theft of firearm. Class 6 felony. Up to one year in prison and fine of at least $1,000 plus surcharges
  • Value is $2,000 up to less than $3,000. Class 5 felony. Nine months up to 1.5 years in prison and fine of at least $1,000 plus surcharges
  • Value is $3,000 up to less than $4,000. Class 4 felony. 18 months to 3.75 years in prison and a minimum fine of $1,000 plus surcharges
  • Value is $4,000 up to less than $25,000. Class 3 felony. 2.5 years to 8.75 years in prison and a minimum fine of $1,000 plus surcharges
  • Value is$25,000 and higher. Class 2 felony. 4 years to 12.5 years in prison and a minimum fine of $1,000 plus surcharges

Arkansas

2010 Arkansas Code, Title 23 – Public Utilities and Regulated Industries, Subtitle 2 – Financial Institutions And Securities, Chapter 50 – Miscellaneous Violations of Banking Laws, Section 23-50-105 – Embezzlement, misuse of funds, etc., by officer, director, etc.

  • Value below $1,000. Class A misdemeanor. Up to one year in jail and fine of $1,000
  • Value between $1,000 and $5,000. Class D felony. Up to six years in prison and fine of $10,000
  • Value between $5,000 and $25,000. Class C felony. Up to 10 years in prison and fine of $10,000.
  • Value above $25,000. Class B felony. Up to 20 years in prison and/or fine of $15,000.
  • Enhanced penalties for objects that have an inherent, subjective, or idiosyncratic value to its owner even if the property has no market value or replacement cost; and for utility company property.

California

  • Penal Code Section 514
  • Penal Code Sections 484 to 502.9
  • Cal Pen. Code Section 186.11
  • Cal Pen. Code Section 515

Penalties are:

  • Value is less than $950. Petty theft. Up to six months in jail and/or up to $1,000 fine
  • Value is more than $950. Grand theft, which is a felony. Six months to three years in state prison

Colorado

Colorado Revised Statutes Section 18-4-401, Section 18-8-407

  • Value below $50. Class 1 petty offense. Up to six months in jail and fine of up to $500
  • Value is $50 up to less than $300. Class 3 misdemeanor. Up to six months in jail and fine of up to $750
  • Value is $300 up to less than $750. Class 2 misdemeanor. Up to one year in prison and fine of up to $1000
  • Value is $750 up to less than $2,000. Class 1 misdemeanor. Up to 1.5 years in prison and fine of up to $5000
  • Values is $2000 up to less than $5,000. Class 6 felony. Up to 1.5 years in prison and fine of up to $100,000
  • Value is $5,000 up to $20,000. Class 5 felony. Up to 3 years in prison and fine of up to $100,000

Connecticut

Larceny by Embezzlement — Section 53a-119 (1) and Sections 53a-122 through 53a-125b

  • Value below $500. Class C misdemeanor. Fine of up to $500 and/or up to three months in jail.
  • Value between $500 and $1,000. Class B misdemeanor. Fine of up to $1,000 and/or up to six months in jail.
  • Value between $1,000 and $2,000. Class A misdemeanor. Fine up to $2,000 and/or up to one year in jail.
  • Value between $2,000 and $10,000, vehicle worth below $10,000, public records, biological samples, microorganisms, cultures, records of scientific secrets, inventions, or technical processes. Class D felony. Fine up to $5,000 and/or between one and five years in prison.
  • Value between $10,000 and $20,000, vehicle worth above $10,000, public property worth less than $2,000, victim older than 60 or physically disabled or blind, property belonging to telecommunications services that were interrupted. Class C felony. Fine up to $10,000 and/or between one and 10 years in prison.
  • Value above $20,000, vehicle worth above $20,000, public property worth above $2,000. Class B felony. Fine up to $15,000 and/or between one and 20 years in prison.

Delaware

Tit. 11 Section205(a), (b), (h), (c), (e), (i)

  • Value below $1,500. Class A misdemeanor. Up to one year in jail and/or fine up to $2,300.
  • Value between $1,500 and $50,000. Class G felony. Up to two years in prison.
  • Value between $50,000 and $100,000. Class E felony. Up to five years in prison.
  • Value above $100,000. Class C felony. Up to 15 years in prison.

Florida

Fl. Stat. Ann. Section 812.014

  • 1st, 2nd, or 3rd degree felony. Up to five years in prison.
  • 1st or 2nd degree embezzlement. Up to $1,000 in fines and up to one year in jail.
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement of a fire extinguisher, more than 2,000 citrus fruits, and stop signs.

Georgia

Georgia Code, Title 16, Crimes and Offenses, Chapter 8, Section 4

  • Value is $500 or lower. Up to one year in jail and/or fine of up to $1,000
  • Value above $500. One to 10 years in prison and/or fine of up to $1,000
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement valued over $500 that includes a ferrous metal.

Hawaii

  • 708-831 Theft in the second degree. 2013 Hawaii Revised Statutes
  • 708-833 Theft in the fourth degree. 2013 Hawaii Revised Statutes
  • 708-830.5 Theft in the first degree. 2012 Hawaii Revised Statutes

Penalties:

  • Value above $20,000. Theft in the 1st up to 10 years in prison and/or fine of up to $25,000
  • Value between $300 and $20,000. Theft in the 2nd Up to five years in prison and fine of up to $10,000
  • Value between $100 and $300. Theft in the 3rd Up to one year in jail and/or fine of up to $2,000
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement of aquaculture products (fish) from a fenced, private area.

Idaho

  • Section 18-2403 – Idaho State Legislature
  • Section 18-2408 – Idaho State Legislature
  • Section 18-2407 – Idaho State Legislature

Penalties:

  • Felony for embezzlement of public property or money.
  • Felony for public servants who use their position to embezzle public property or money.
  • Between one and 20 years in prison and/or fine of up to $10,000

Illinois

Illinois Statutes Section 5/16-1

  • Value below $500. Up to one year in jail and fine of up to $2,500
  • Value between $500 and $10,000. Fine of up to $25,000 and between two and five years in jail.
  • Value above $10,000. Fine of up to $100,000 and between three and seven years in jail.

Indiana

Indiana Code Section 29-1-13-9 [estate embezzlement]

  • Civil liability for taken amount. Possible imprisonment.

Indiana Code Section 35-43-4-1 et seq. [theft]

  • Value is $750 to $50,000 or if there is previous conviction for theft. Level 6 felony. Six months to 2.5 years in prison and up to $10,000 in fines
  • Value is more than $50,000. Level 5 felony. One to six years in prison and fine of up to $10,000

Iowa

2011 Iowa Code, TITLE XVI CRIMINAL LAW AND PROCEDURE, SUBTITLE 1 CRIME CONTROL AND CRIMINAL ACTS, CHAPTER 714 THEFT, FRAUD, AND RELATED OFFENSES

  • Value below $200. Fine of $50 to $500 and/or up to 30 days in jail.
  • Value between $200 and $500. Fine of $250 to $1,500 and/or up to one year in jail.
  • Value between $500 and $1,500. Fine of $500 to $5,000 and/or up to two years in prison.

Kansas

21-5801 Theft. 2014 Kansas Statutes. US Codes and Statutes

  • Value below $1,000. Fine of up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $1,000 and $25,000. Fine of up to $100,000 and/or up to six months in jail

Kentucky

Kentucky Revised Statutes – Chapter 514

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $500 and/or between 90 days and one year in jail
  • Value between $500 and $10,000. Fine between $1,000 and $10,000 and/or between one and five years in prison
  • Value above $10,000. Fine of between $1,000 and $10,000 and/or between five and 10 years in prison

Louisiana

LA Rev Stat Section 14:67 – RS 14:67 – Theft 2011

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or between six months and a year in jail
  • Value between $500 and $1,500. Fine up to $2,000 and/or up to five years in prison
  • Value above $1,5000. Fine up to $3,000 and/or up to 10 years in prison

Maine

Title 17-A: MAINE CRIMINAL CODE, Part 2: SUBSTANTIVE OFFENSES, Chapter 15: THEFT, Section353-A, Section353. Theft by unauthorized taking or transfer

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to one year in jail.
  • Value between $500 and $1,000. Fine up to $2,000 and/or between one and three years in prison.
  • Value between $1,000 and $10,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or between three and five years in prison.

Maryland

2010 Maryland Code, CRIMINAL LAW, TITLE 7 – THEFT AND RELATED CRIMES, Subtitle 1 – Crimes Involving Theft, Section 7-113 – Embezzlement – Fraudulent misappropriation by fiduciary, Section 7-113. Embezzlement – Fraudulent misappropriation by fiduciary.

  • Fine of between $50 and $100.
  • Between one and five years in prison.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 266 Section 57

  • Value below $250. Fine of between $50 and $600 and/or between six months in jail and two and a half years in prison for 1st offense
  • Value above $250, embezzlement of firearms. Fine of up to $25,000 and/or up to five years in prison

Michigan

  • Comp. Laws Ann. Section 750.174
  • Comp. Laws Ann. Section 750.174(8)
  • Comp. Laws Ann. Section 750.175
  • Comp. Laws Ann. Section 750.176
  • Comp. Laws Ann. Section 750.177
  • Comp. Laws Ann. Section 750.180
  • Comp. Laws Ann. Section 750.182

Penalties:

  • Value below $200. Fine up to $500 or three times the value of the property and/or up to 93 days in jail
  • Value between $200 and $1,000. Fine up to $2,000 or three times the value of the property and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $1,000 and $20,000. Fine up to $10,000 or three times the value of the property and/or up to five years in prison

Minneosta

  • 54 – 2017 Minnesota Statutes – Revisor of Statutes EMBEZZLEMENT OF PUBLIC FUNDS
  • 52 – 2017 Minnesota Statutes – Revisor of Statutes
  • 611 – 2017 Minnesota Statutes – Revisor of Statutes

Penalties:

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to 90 days in jail
  • Value between $500 and $1,000. Fine up to $3,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $1,000 and $5,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to five years in prison

Mississippi

  • 2014 Mississippi Code, Title 97 – CRIMES, Chapter 23 – OFFENSES AFFECTING TRADE, BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONS, Section 97-23-19 – Embezzlement; by agents, bailees, trustees, servants and persons generally
  • 2013 Mississippi Code, Title 97 – CRIMES, Chapter 23 – OFFENSES AFFECTING TRADE, BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONS, Section 97-23-25 – Embezzlement; property held in trust or received on contract

Penalties:

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to six months in jail
  • Value is $500 or more. Fine up to $25,000 and/or up to 10 years in prison

Missouri

2005 Missouri Revised Statutes – Chapter 570 – Stealing and Related Offenses

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $500 and $25,000. Fine up to $5,000 or twice the value of the property up to $20,000 and up to seven years in prison
  • Value above $25,000. Fine up to twice the value of the property up to $20,000 and between five and 15 years in prison

Montana

45-6-301. Theft.

  • Value below $1,500. Fine up to $1,500 and/or up to six months in jail
  • Value between $1,500 and $10,000. Fine up to $50,000 and/or up to 10 years in prison
  • Value above $10,000. Fine up to $50,000 and/or between one and 10 years in prison

Nebraska

28-518 – Nebraska Legislature

  • Value below $200. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to six months in jail
  • Value between $200 and $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to one year in prison
  • Value between $500 and $1,500. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to five years in prison
  • Value above $1,500. Fine up to $25,000 and/or between one and 20 years in prison

Nevada

  • NRS 205.300
  • NRS 668.055 – Embezzlement; willful misapplication of money

Penalties:

  • Value below $650. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to six months in jail
  • Value between $650 and $3,500. Fine up to $10,000 and/or between one and five years in prison
  • Value above $3,5000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or between one and 10 years in prison

New Hampshire

2010 New Hampshire Statutes, TITLE LXII CRIMINAL CODE, CHAPTER 637 THEFT, Section 637:3 Theft by Unauthorized Taking or Transfer

  • Value below $1,000. Fine up to $2,000 or twice the amount embezzled, whichever is greater and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $1,000 and $1,500, including property valued below $1,000 but embezzled for reselling. Fine up to $4,000 or twice the amount embezzled, whichever is greater and/or up to seven years in prison
  • Value above $1,5000 or stolen firearms. Fine up to $4,000 or twice the amount embezzled, whichever is greater and/or up to 15 years in prison

New Jersey

  • New Jersey Statutes 2C:20-3 (Theft)
  • New Jersey Statutes 2C:20-2, 2C:43-3 (Penalties)

Penalties:

  • Value below $200. Restitution and/or fine up to $1,000
  • Value between $200 and $500. Restitution, fine up to $10,000, and/or up to 18 months in prison
  • Value between $500 and $75,000. Restitution, fine up to $15,000, and/or between three and five years in prison
  • Value above $75,000. Restitution, fine up to $150,000, and/or between five and 10 years in prison

New Mexico

NM Stat Section 30-16-8 :: Section 30-16-8: Embezzlement

  • Value below $250. Fine up to $500 and/or up to six months in jail
  • Value between $250 and $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $500 and $2,500. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to 18 months in prison
  • Value between $2,500 and $20,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to three years in prison
  • Value above $20,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to nine years in prison

New York

  • New York Penal Law Section 155.00 (larceny definitions)
  • New York Penal Law Section 155.05 (larceny/embezzlement)
  • New York Penal Law Section 155.15 (defenses)
  • New York Penal Law Sections 155.30 – 155.43 (grand larceny)
  • New York Penal Law Section 155.20 (value of stolen property)

Penalties:

  • Value below $1,000. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $1,000 and $3,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to four years in prison
  • Value between $3,000 and $50,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to seven years in prison
  • Value between $50,000 and $100,000. Fine up to $15,000 and/or up to 15 years in prison
  • Value above $100,000. Fine up to $30,000 and/or up to 25 years in prison
  • Enhanced penalties for embezzlement of any religious item value at above $100

North Carolina

  • C. Gen. Stat. Ann. Sections 14-91 & 14-92
  • C. Gen. Stat. Ann. Sections 14-93, 14-94, 14-97, & 53-129

Penalties vary depending on the defendant’s position in relation to the victim, such as a public servant. Additionally, the type of property and its value will determine greatly the applicable punishment.

North Dakota

2015 North Dakota Century Code. Chapter 12.1-23 Theft and Related Offenses.

  • Value below $250. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to 30 days in jail
  • Value between $250 and $500. Fine up to $2,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $500 and $10,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to five years in prison
  • Value above $10.000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to 10 years in prison

Ohio

  • 64 Embezzlement prima-facie evidence. – Ohio Revised Code
  • Chapter 2913: THEFT AND FRAUD – Ohio Revised Code

Penalties:

  • Value below $1,000. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to 180 days in jail
  • Value between $1,000 and $7,500. Fine up to $2,000 and/or between six months and one year in jail
  • Value between $7,5000 and $150,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or between six months in jail and 18 months in prison
  • Value between $150,000 and $750,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or between nine months in jail and 36 months in prison

Oklahoma

  • Stat. Ann. Section 1451(B)
  • Stat. Ann. Section 1451(C)
  • Stat. Ann. Section 341

Penalties:

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $500 and $1,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to one year in jail and/or restitution
  • Value between $1,000 and $25,000. Fine up to fine $5,000 and/or up to five years in prison and/or restitution

Oregon

ORS 164.055 – Theft in the first degree – 2015 Oregon Revised Statutes

  • Value below $100. Fine up to $1,250 and/or up to 30 days in jail
  • Value between $100 and $1,000. Fine up to $6,250 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value above $1,000. Fine up to $125,000 and/or up to five years in prison

Pennsyvlania

18 Pa. Cons. Stat. section 3927 et. seq.

  • Value below $50. Fine up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $50 and $200. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to two years in prison
  • Value between $200 and $2,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to five years in prison
  • Value above $2,000. Fine up to $15,000 and/or up to seven years in prison
  • Enhanced penalties for embezzlement by school treasurers

Rhode Island

  • 2014 Rhode Island General Laws, Title 11 – Criminal Offenses, Chapter 11-41 – Theft, Embezzlement, False Pretenses, and Misappropriation
  • 2013 Rhode Island General Laws, Title 11 – Criminal Offenses, Chapter 11-41 – Theft, Embezzlement, False Pretenses, and Misappropriation, Section 11-41-3 – Embezzlement and fraudulent conversion.

Penalties:

  • Value is $100 or lower. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value above $100. Fine up to $50,000 or three times the value of the embezzlement, whichever is greater, and/or up to 20 years in prison.

South Carolina

  • Financial Transaction Card Crime Act
  • 2012 South Carolina Code of Laws, Title 16 – Crimes and Offenses, Chapter 13 – FORGERY, LARCENY, EMBEZZLEMENT, FALSE PRETENSES AND CHEATS, ARTICLE 1 MISCELLANEOUS OFFENSES
  • 2012 South Carolina Code of Laws, Title 16 – Crimes and Offenses, Chapter 13 – FORGERY, LARCENY, EMBEZZLEMENT, FALSE PRETENSES AND CHEATS, Section 16-13-210 – Embezzlement of public funds.
  • 2013 South Carolina Code of Laws, Title 16 – Crimes and Offenses, CHAPTER 13 – FORGERY, LARCENY, EMBEZZLEMENT, FALSE PRETENSES AND CHEATS, SECTION 16-13-380. Theft of electric current.

Penalties:

  • Value below $2,000. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to 30 days in jail
  • Value between $2,000 and $10,000. Fine determined by the judge and/or up to five years in prison
  • Value above $10,000. Fine determine by the judge and/or up to 10 years in prison
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement of electric currents

South Dakota

  • SDLRC – Codified Law 22-30A
  • SDLRC – Codified Law 22-30A-17
  • South Dakota Codified Laws > Title 22 > Chapter 30A – Theft

Penalties:

  • Value below $400. Fine up to $500 and/or up to 30 days in jail
  • Fine between $400 and $1,000. Fine up to $2,000 and/or up to one year in prison
  • Value above $1,000. Fine up to $30,000 and/or up to 15 years in prison
  • Enhanced penalties for embezzlement of buffalo or captive non-domestic elk

Tennesse

  • TCA Section 39-14-105
  • 40-13-221 – Alleging embezzlement and breach of trust

Penalties:

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $500 and $1,000. Fine up to $3,000 and/or between one and six years in prison
  • Value between $1,000 and $10,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or between two and 12 years in prison
  • Value between $10,000 and $60,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or between three and 15 years in prison
  • Value above $60,000. Fine up to $25,000 and/or between eight and 30 years in prison
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzling public money meant for highway or road use by a chief administrative officer

Texas

  • Texas Stat. & Code Ann. Section 31.03.
  • Texas Stat. & Code Ann. Section 31.03(f)

Penalties:

  • Value below $50. Fine up to $500
  • Value between $50 and $500, theft of personal identification card or driver’s license issued by any state Fine up to $2,000 and/or up to 180 days in jail
  • Value between $500 and $1,500. Fine up to $4,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $1,500 and $20.000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or between 180 days and two years in prison
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement by someone who is in a contractual relationship with the government

Utah

  • Utah Code. Title 76, Utah Criminal Code. Chapter 6, Offenses Against Property. Part 4, Theft. Section 412, Theft — Classification of offenses — Action for treble damages
  • Utah Code. Title 76, Utah Criminal Code. Chapter 6, Offenses Against Property. Part 4, Theft. Section 403, Theft — Evidence to support accusation.
  • Utah Code. Title 76, Utah Criminal Code. Chapter 6, Offenses Against Property. Part 4, Theft. Section 406, Theft by extortion

Penalties:

  • Value below $500. Fine up to $1,000 and/or up to six months in jail
  • Value between $500 and $1,500. Fine up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $1,500 and $5,000. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to five years in prison
  • Value above $5,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or between one and 15 years in prison

Vermont

  • 2012 Vermont Statutes Title 13 Crimes and Criminal Procedure Chapter 57 LARCENY AND EMBEZZLEMENT
  • 2012 Vermont Statutes Title 13 Crimes and Criminal Procedure Chapter 57 LARCENY AND EMBEZZLEMENT Section 2531 Embezzlement generally

Embezzlement can lead to a fine of up to $500 and/or up to 10 years in prison.

Virginia

Virginia Ann. Code Section 18.2-95 &-96

  • Value is $200 or lower. Fine up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value above $200, embezzlement of firearms. Judge’s discretion to sentence to fine up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail; or to sentence to between one and 20 years in prison.

Washington

  • RCW 10.37.110: Larceny or embezzlement
  • Chapter 9a.56 RCW: THEFT AND ROBBERY
  • RCW 43.08.140: Embezzlement – Penalty

Penalties:

  • Value below $750. Fine up to $5,000 and/or up to one year in jail
  • Value between $750 and $5,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to five years in prison
  • Value above $5,000. Fine up to $20,000 and/or up to 10 years in prison
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement of an on-duty search and rescue dog

West Virginia

  • WV Code Section61-3-13
  • 2005 West Virginia Code – Section61-3-20. — Embezzlement

Penalties:

  • Value below $1,000. Fine up to $2,500 and/or up to one year in jail.
  • Value is $1,000 or more. Between one and 10 years in prison. At the judge’s discretion, a defendant may be sentenced to a fine up to $2,5000 and/or up to one year in jail instead.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin Legislature: 943.20(1)(a)

  • Value below $2,500. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to nine months in jail
  • Value between $2,500 and $5,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to three and a half years in prison
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement of property stolen from a corpse

Wyoming

  • ARTICLE 6 – FRAUD :: 2014 Wyoming Statutes
  • 2013 Wyoming Statutes TITLE 6 – CRIMES AND OFFENSES CHAPTER 3 – OFFENSES AGAINST PROPERTY ARTICLE 4 – LARCENY AND RELATED OFFENSES 6-3-402. Theft; penalties
  • 2011 Wyoming Statutes. TITLE 6 – CRIMES AND OFFENSES. livestock rustling; theft of fuel; penalties.

Penalties:

  • Value below $1,000. Fine up to $750 and/or up to six months in jail
  • Value above $1,000. Fine up to $10,000 and/or up to 10 years in prison
  • Enhanced sentences for embezzlement of livestock or fuel

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